Weekly Field Update – 10/12/20

Coastal

Rob Last reports, “Crops are generally looking very well to press with some welcome rain benefiting fall crops.  Whitefly and caterpillar numbers are increasing.  With a few foggy mornings happening over the last week be on the look out for foliar disease pressure to increase given the increase in leaf “wetness”. Plastic and, where applicable, fumigants are applied, ready to begin strawberry planting.  Just a reminder to check plants carefully before planting for crown rots and early foliar pest and disease activity.”

Zack Snipes reports, “We had another wet week in the Lowcountry with 2.5 inches of rain collected at the Coastal Research Station in Charleston.  Things are looking great for strawberry planting in the next few weeks. Be sure to check your plants and roots before you plant them.  Many issues can be solved before plants go into the field. Fall brassicas, squash, lettuce mixes, and root crops are growing and looking great.  We still have whiteflies on many farms.  On most of these farms, spring fields were not terminated once the crop was done which could have led to the explosion of whiteflies we have been seeing this fall.”

Many strawberry growers are putting up fencing BEFORE they plant which drastically enhances the efficacy of the fencing. This fence is about to be baited with a metal tab and peanut butter. Photo from Zack Snipes.

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “Last week was warm and we saw a heavy dew most mornings. We also had some pretty decent rain come through over the weekend. This warm, moist weather has disease increasing fairly aggressively on some crops. Powdery mildew and downy mildew on cucurbits are pretty rough right now. Pecan shucks are opening and nuts are falling from the earlier varieties like Pawnee and Excel. Strawberry planting should begin this week.”

The shuck has opened on this Excel pecan . Photo from Justin Ballew.

Pee Dee

Tony Melton reports, “Still planting processing greens mostly kale and collards because they are a little more resistant to winter cold.  Greens are rapidly growing.  I have already seen some Reflex damage from carryover from last year.  Personally I think it affects roots and keeps them from taking up nutrients and the damage is very similar to magnesium and boron deficiency – so I always recommend applying Epsom salts and boron to combat the problem and it usually works.  Strawberries are going into the beds. Since many are using vapam or k-pam, make sure that enough time is allowed for the fumigate to escape before planting.  Many do not fumigate anymore so don’t forget velum, nimitiz, and majestine are available for nematode control.”

Upstate

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