Weekly Field Update – 11/1/21

For anyone looking to diversify their operation, check out this week’s virtual program on cut flower production. The program will be this Wednesday (11/3) from 12-1pm. Click here to register.

Coastal Region

Rob Last reports, “Following the welcome rainfall last week, crops are looking good. The precipitation will help establish strawberry plants in the area because a lot have only recently been transplanted. Fall brassica crops are developing well, with pressure from diamondback moths being moderate. There are also isolated incidences of whitefly in brassica plantings. The best policy is to scout thoroughly and regularly allow decisions on applications to be made quickly.”

Zack Snipes reports, “Cooler temperatures showed up this past week along with some rain. Everyone is busy planting strawberries. We are a few weeks behind this year but overall the plant quality looks good. Many growers dipped plants prior to planting to prevent crown rot pathogens. One common issue that I have seen this year, and every year, is planting crews planting plants too deep. Although it may not seem like a big deal, planting too deep will cause plants to be small and have reduced yields. You still have time to walk the fields and lift plants up a bit. Bananas and citrus are just about ready to pick in the Lowcountry.”

A Meyer Lemon just before harvest. Photo from Zack Snipes.
A nice cluster of SC bananas. Photo from Zack Snipes.

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “Temperatures were a little cooler last week and we got some much-needed rain. Strawberry planting has finished now and plants are starting to push out some new leaves. We have seen some plants that were planted a little deep and some that settled too much after transplanting, so be sure to go through the fields and gently pull these plants up to the correct height and reform the soil around them. The best time to do this is before the plants have produced tons of new roots. It’s going to be cooler this week and plants are already a little behind from being planted late. Therefore, growers may want to consider using row covers this month for 2-3 weeks to increase growing degree days and promote growth. There is a great article in the latest NC Strawberry Association Newsletter (pages 6-8) about using row covers in the fall.”

Strawberry plants are starting to push out new leaves. Photo from Justin Ballew
New roots seem to be developing pretty well so far. Photo from Justin Ballew.

Pee Dee

Bruce McLean reports, “Last week’s rain helped to moisten up the soil a bit, but we are still pretty dry across the Pee Dee. Fall vegetable crops are looking good for the most part. Spider mites, aphids, and stink bugs have been very active. Last week’s showers likely knocked back the aphid and spider mite population some, but they will come back. Be sure to actively scout for them. Strawberries are finishing up being planted, and are looking good. Much of the strawberry crop is a little late this year. Be sure to monitor soil moisture (…since it is rather dry), making sure it doesn’t get too dry underneath the plastic. Also since spider mite activity has been up, it would be a good idea to scout for spider mites on strawberries and treat accordingly if mite pressure becomes high enough.”

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