Field Update 11/18

Coastal

Zack Snipes

We have had a good bit of rain and some cooler temperatures this past week.  I have noticed damage to strawberries in fields with no fencing that will cause significant yield loss this spring. I have also noticed areas in fields where deer are going under fencing. Be sure to scout your fields and take note of where deer might be entering in your field and make necessary adjustments.  In one particular case the outside fence was slightly higher in one area which allowed the deer to walk under.  I found one field where the fence was not plugged back in after workers exited.  Be sure your fencing is on all the time.

Deer found the high spot in the fence and are beginning to travel under.

 

 

Pee Dee

Tony Melton

Sweet potato tops are dead but we are still harvesting for processing.  Greens were damaged a small amount from the cold last week.  We saw a little worse damage in upper Chesterfield and in Lancaster County than in other areas.

Upstate

Andy Rollins

Close inspection of young peach trees in this case revealed two problems.  Greater peach tree borer GPTB and scale.  If growers are seeing this jelly at the base of there trees they need to inspect further many times it is GPTB but not always.  This problem can be treated with mating disruption using PTB duel.  Young trees need to be trunk  treated with chlorpyrifos “Lorsban”.  Scale problem is the white looking dots along the trunk.  Dormant oil applications should help with reducing this problem but shouldn’t be overlooked.  Keep inspecting closely.

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Jelly coming from the base of peach trees could indicate Greater peach tree borer (GPTB) presence.  Note the scale (white dots) on the trunk.

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Peach orchard in Upstate SC

 

Private Pesticide License Block Ends 12/31/19

As of today (11/1/19), there are only two months remaining in the current private pesticide license block.  The block ends on 12/31/19.  This means private applicators have until the end of December to earn the 5 pesticide credits (CEUs) needed to renew their licenses.

To check the number of credits you have, visit the Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) website, type in your last name and hit “Run Applicator Report”.  Again, if you still need credits, the deadline to get them is 12/31.

To find opportunities to earn credits, click on the “Upcoming Events” tab on this website or contact your local Clemson Extension office.

Once you have earned the 5 required credits, don’t forget to fill out and return your renewal paperwork to DPR.  If you have 5 credits and do not receive renewal paperwork from DPR in the mail by the end of the year, please reach out to them.  Their contact info can be found here.

Field Update – 8/26/19

Coastal Region

Dr. Tony Keinath reports, “Phytophthora crown rot was observed on bronze fennel in a home landscape (mine) in Charleston. Fennel apparently is a new host for Phytophthora  (species not identified). Foliar symptoms include a progressive yellowing, starting with the older leaves. Symptoms on the lower stem and leaf sheath are a water-soaked, “greasy” rot. It is very likely that Florence (green, edible) fennel also is susceptible. Potassium phosphite products are the only fungicides registered for post-transplant applications on the leafy vegetables crop group that includes fennel.”

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Yellowing of fennel foliage from Phytophthora crown rot. Photo from Dr. Tony Keinath.

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Water-soaked, greasy rot symptom on the lower sheaths. Photo from Dr. Tony Keinath.

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “We got some much-needed rain over most of the midlands this week and temperatures have been a little cooler over the last few days.  Planting continues with fall brassicas and diamond back moth caterpillars are showing up already.  We need to be scouting weekly for those and using the treatment threshold of 5 worms per 10 plants at this stage of the season.  The recent moisture is causing an increase in disease pressure, so stay on your regular spray schedules.”

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Diamondback moth pupa on the underside of a collard leaf. Photo from Justin Ballew.

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Diseases like anthracnose could increase following with past week’s rain. Photo from Justin Ballew

Sarah Scott reports, “Peaches are wrapping up around the ridge. Broccoli plants are still going in for fall harvest. We have had rain in the last week which has been a nice break on irrigation systems.”

Pee Dee Region

Tony Melton reports, “Last of pickling cucumbers have been planted.  Collard, kale, turnips, mustard, etc. planting in full swing with both transplants and direct seeding.  Bed prep for strawberries has begun.  Getting late to order strawberry plants. Fall blackberry harvest is continuing.   Sweet potato harvest will begin soon.  Double cropped processing peas are starting to flower.  Butterbeans planted for fall production are starting to flower.”

Upstate

Kerrie Roach reports, “The last few peaches are being picked this week in Oconee County. The apple harvest is coming along nicely, ‘Early Fuji’ and ‘Golden Delicious’ apples will start to be picked this week. A spotty hail storm in Long Creek last week has caused some damage across the orchards, but is very localized. Summer market vegetable growers are wrapping things up with some of the Farmers Markets closing at the end of August. With rain & cooler weather forecasted, disease and weed management will be a continued battle for growers.”

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Early Fuji apples from the Upstate. Photo from Kerrie Roach.

SC Farmers Can Help Report Drought Conditions

No one keeps a closer eye on the weather and understands the impacts of drought more than farmers.  Therefore, the US Drought Monitor is seeking help from farmers in reporting drought conditions.  See the handout below and access the mobile friendly survey sight here. View the PDF with working links here: USDM DroughtImpactReporter SC flyer

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Charleston Grower Sidi Limehouse Named 2019 Swisher Sweets SC Farmer of the Year

Charleston produce grower Sidi Limehouse will represent South Carolina in the Swisher Sweets Farmer of the Year award program at the Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moutlrie, GA in October.  Sidi grows and sells a variety of produce as well as cut flowers and a number of value added products.  He is active in land conservation groups and is a believer in using land conservation practices on his own farm.  He has also spent time apprenticing young and beginning farmers in the low country.

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2019 Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo South Carolina Farmer of the Year Sidi Limehouse and Clemson Cooperative Extension Service horticulture agent Zack Snipes talk about growing vegetables on Johns Island.
Image Credit: Clemson Public Service and Agriculture

Clemson’s media team wrote a great piece about Sidi to commemorate his being named the 2018 SC Farmer of the Year that you can read here.

Sidi takes the reigns from Ridge Spring cattle producer, Kevin Yon, who was named the 2018 Swisher Sweets SC Farmer of the Year.  Kevin went on to be named the Overall 2018 Farmer of the Year.