Captan Could Be Scarce in 2021

From Clemson Fruit Pathologist Dr. Guido Schnabel and UGA Fruit Pathologist Dr. Phil Brannen.

Unfortunately, there appears to be a shortage of Captan products this year. For our fruit crop producers this may result in a change of strategy if and when reserves run out. Strawberry growers fortunately have the option to use Thiram for basic gray mold and anthracnose control. The two products are basically equal in efficacy but thiram has a slight edge over captan for gray mold control, but it is a bit weaker against anthracnose.

Peach growers rely on captan for cover sprays. These early to mid-season applications manage green fruit rot and possibly anthracnose. Fortunately, during bloom and preharvest we use different chemistries at our disposal listed in the spray guide. As we mention often, we prefer to hold other chemical classes, those for which Monilinia fructicola (brown rot) is most likely to develop resistance, for use in the pre-harvest sprays. During captan shortage, we recommend application of two applications of a QoI/SDHI (FRAC 7+11) product, such as Luna Sensation, Merivon, Pristine or Quadris Top (FRAC 3+11), for cover sprays as needed this year. Along with any remaining captan products, we hope that this will help us to limp along till next year, while still providing excellent control of cover spray pathogens. Sulfur alone in cover sprays, though sufficient for scab control, is not efficacious for green fruit rot or other diseases; if using a QoI/SDHI (7+11) product, these will control scab as well as green fruit rot, so sulfur would not be necessary for these applications. As always, please contact your local extension agent should you have questions.

SC DPR Releases Statement on Recent Dicamba Cancellations

This week, the SC Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) released a statement regarding the EPA’s cancellation of three dicamba products following a Federal Court of Appeals decision to vacate their registrations. The three products (Xtendimax, Engenia, and FeXapan), labeled for use with tolerant soybean and cotton varieties, have been a hot button issue since their initial registration in 2016. Concerns of off-target damage due to drift and volatilization have been at the center of this contention.

According to DPR, “Pesticide dealers in South Carolina who have existing stock of these products should stop all sales immediately and contact their dealer representative to facilitate a return to the registrant or other legal disposal. The EPA final cancellation order allows for Commercial and Private applicators who have possession of existing stock of these products to lawfully use them until Friday, July 31, 2020. After this date no legal uses of these products will be permitted and existing stock must be disposed of in a legal manner.”

Read the full DPR news release here.

Read the full EPA cancellation order here.

The Court of Appeals ruling and subsequent cancellations do not affect other formulations of dicamba.

Private Pesticide License Block Ends 12/31/19

As of today (11/1/19), there are only two months remaining in the current private pesticide license block.  The block ends on 12/31/19.  This means private applicators have until the end of December to earn the 5 pesticide credits (CEUs) needed to renew their licenses.

To check the number of credits you have, visit the Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) website, type in your last name and hit “Run Applicator Report”.  Again, if you still need credits, the deadline to get them is 12/31.

To find opportunities to earn credits, click on the “Upcoming Events” tab on this website or contact your local Clemson Extension office.

Once you have earned the 5 required credits, don’t forget to fill out and return your renewal paperwork to DPR.  If you have 5 credits and do not receive renewal paperwork from DPR in the mail by the end of the year, please reach out to them.  Their contact info can be found here.

Guide for New Required Paraquat Training

Paraquat (most commonly used as Gramoxone) will have a new label beginning as early as August 2019.  The new label requires applicators to take a training every three years.  Currently, the training is only available online.  The link below is a PDF of a step-by-step tutorial made to guide someone through the online training. Paraquat Training Instructions. The training and assessment should take around 45 minutes to complete.

Also, under this new label, every applicator applying paraquat must have a pesticide applicator’s license.  Applicators may no longer apply paraquat under the supervision of another certified applicator.  Contact your local Clemson Extension office about opportunities to get a pesticide applicator’s license.