Field Update 11/18

Coastal

Zack Snipes

We have had a good bit of rain and some cooler temperatures this past week.  I have noticed damage to strawberries in fields with no fencing that will cause significant yield loss this spring. I have also noticed areas in fields where deer are going under fencing. Be sure to scout your fields and take note of where deer might be entering in your field and make necessary adjustments.  In one particular case the outside fence was slightly higher in one area which allowed the deer to walk under.  I found one field where the fence was not plugged back in after workers exited.  Be sure your fencing is on all the time.

Deer found the high spot in the fence and are beginning to travel under.

 

 

Pee Dee

Tony Melton

Sweet potato tops are dead but we are still harvesting for processing.  Greens were damaged a small amount from the cold last week.  We saw a little worse damage in upper Chesterfield and in Lancaster County than in other areas.

Upstate

Andy Rollins

Close inspection of young peach trees in this case revealed two problems.  Greater peach tree borer GPTB and scale.  If growers are seeing this jelly at the base of there trees they need to inspect further many times it is GPTB but not always.  This problem can be treated with mating disruption using PTB duel.  Young trees need to be trunk  treated with chlorpyrifos “Lorsban”.  Scale problem is the white looking dots along the trunk.  Dormant oil applications should help with reducing this problem but shouldn’t be overlooked.  Keep inspecting closely.

IMG_0685

Jelly coming from the base of peach trees could indicate Greater peach tree borer (GPTB) presence.  Note the scale (white dots) on the trunk.

image0

Peach orchard in Upstate SC

 

Field Update – 4/29/19

Statewide: Dr. Tony Keinath reports finding powdery mildew on Hale’s Best Jumbo cantaloupe in Charleston last week. “Anyone growing heirloom varieties of cucurbits should spray for powdery mildew, because open-pollinated varieties do not have the resistance found in hybrid varieties. All cucurbit growers should be on the lookout for powdery mildew starting now and be ready to spray when it shows up on their farms.”

Dr. Guido Schnabel reports, “2019 promises to be a great peach season despite the one late freeze we had late March. Still, some remnants of this late freeze can still be observed on many cultivars. They include peach buttons next to well developing fruit. The embryo of those button peaches are often damaged. These buttons will soon fall off the tree. Most cultivars do have enough normal fruit, however, for a full or nearly full crop.”

Freeze damaged peaches and healthy peaches. Photo from Dr. Guido Schnabel.
Peach button with dead embryo due to freeze damage. Photo from Guido Schnabel.

Coastal: Zack Snipes reports, “Beautiful weather last week really helped the progress of spring crops like tomato, pepper, and squash. We should be harvesting the first flush of squash this week. Spring onions, broccoli, radishes, carrots, beets, turnips, and greens are continuing to be harvested. Have seen some major issues with the diamond back moth this spring on greens.”

Tomatoes are growing well in the Coastal Region. Photo from Zack Snipes.
The first squash harvest is getting close in Charleston. Photo from Zack Snipes.

Midlands: Justin Ballew reports, “Strawberry harvest has picked up this week and disease is very low since the weather has been dry. Spring and Summer crops are growing fast. A few spidermites have been seen and could increase quickly if it stays dry. Keep an eye out for those.”

Sarah Scott reports finding high numbers of brown marmorated stink bugs in traps along the Ridge. “While scouting the orchards I saw a few peaches that had some stink bug damage as well. Not wide spread but it is showing up so be mindful when you’re scouting in the coming week.”

Stink bug damage on a young peach. Photo from Sarah Scott.

Upstate: Andy Rollins reports, “Strawberry production is finally in full swing after a very delayed start to our year.  Early picking resulted in some knotty fruit but fruit quality and flavor are excellent now across all of the upstate. Slug problems show up when we have high moisture conditions as in the below picture from a neighboring state. Deadline pellets are a very effective control should they show up here, but caution is needed to keep the pellets from directly contacting fruit when applying.”

Strawberry harvest is in full swing in the upstate.
Slug damage on a strawberry. Photo from Andy Rollins.