Field Update – 9/30/19

Coastal Region

Zack Snipes reports, “It has been very dry here in the Lowcountry.  Our dry land crops are struggling and even irrigated crops are in need of more water.  I found a good number of melonworms this week in cucumber so keep an eye out if you have any cucurbits planted.  I scouted many collard and cabbage fields this past week and found very few caterpillars.  I saw a few isolated areas of harlequin bug damage so scout regularly to stay on top of those.  Our cowpeas are filling out pods right now and unfortunately I found some cowpea curculio in some of the peas.  The good news is that with our dry weather there are very few diseases right now.”

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Worms feeding on cucumber leaves. Photo from Zack Snipes.

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Cowpea curculio grub that was inside of a pea pod. Photo from Zack Snipes.

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “No changes in the weather from last week. It’s still hot and very dry. Growers are working on bedding fields in preparation for strawberry planting, though it’s difficult to form beds without any soil moisture. Hemp is budding nicely and harvest will probably start in another couple weeks. Caterpillars are still building in a number of crops. We’re seeing diamond back moth, cabbage loopers, and corn earworms mainly.”

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Field being prepped for strawberries. Photo from Justin Ballew.

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Hemp buds that will be harvested for CBD extraction. Photo from Justin Ballew.

Sarah Scott reports, “We continue to have hot, dry conditions with rainfall in scattered areas. Bell peppers, squash, tomatoes, watermelon, sweet potatoes and eggplant being harvested. Hot, sunny conditions cause some sun scald on bell peppers (photo). Peach growers are still keeping an eye out for San Jose scale. Although many growers do not do a post-harvest spray, scale are still active and if a grower has a particularly high population or an area where scale was bad this season, apply a summer oil, diluted dormant oil or a light oil like TriTek which could reduce populations for next year. Growers should be mindful that a full rate dormant spray may defoliate the trees, so scale down.”

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Sun scald on pepper. Photo from Sarah Scott.

Upstate

Andy Rollins reports, “Strawberry plugs are going through extreme transplant shock due to excessive dry heat.  Smaller sized plugs are more susceptible even in well watered fields.  Early morning overhead waterings of 30 min to 1 hour are recommended to help during first week to two weeks.  Other problems are being investigated, but are unlikely the main problem on these farms.”

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Newly transplanted strawberry plug experiencing transplant shock.  Photo from Andy Rollins.

 

 

Field Update – 5/28/19

Statewide

Dr. Tony Keinath reports, “Downy mildew has moved into south Georgia on cucumber and watermelon. Growers should have downy mildew fungicides on hand and be ready to spray cucumber, cantaloupe, and watermelon when rain starts in the lower half of the state. A preventative spray of mancozeb or chlorothalonil would be a good idea in the meantime. You can keep track of the spread of downy mildew here.

Despite the dry weather, anthracnose was found on watermelon in the Bamberg/Barnwell County area last week. All watermelons in the state should be sprayed with mancozeb as a preventative.”

Anthracnose lesions on watermelon leaf. Photo from Dr. Tony Keinath

Coastal Region

Zack Snipes reports, “It has been unusually hot for the month of May.  The current heat wave coupled with the lack of rain is really starting to have an impact on crops, even irrigated crops.  The tomato and melon crops look good but are starting to feel the intense heat and lack of rain.  I have seen very little disease and insect pressure on all crops.

Irrigated watermelons are looking great on the Coast. Photo from Zack Snipes.
Irrigated peppers wilting in the heat of the day. Photo from Zack Snipes

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “This past week was hot and dry. It felt more like July than May. It’s been over two weeks now since we’ve had any rain and irrigation systems are running a lot. In larger fields with overhead irrigation, we are seeing some wilting where the pivots aren’t getting around fast enough. Drip irrigated crops are looking good. Silks are starting to brown on the earliest planted sweet corn. Blackberry picking will begin soon and muscadines have begun blooming.

Collards wilting in between watering. Photo from Justin Ballew
Silks are turning brown on earliest planted sweet corn. Photo from Justin Ballew