Field Update – 7/8/19

Don’t forget to check out the “Upcoming Events” tab for events around the state. 

Coastal Region

Zack Snipes reports, “It’s hot in the Lowcountry! We are just about finished on all summer crops. Bell peppers and rabbiteye blueberries should finish up this week. We are still picking some okra and hot peppers. Keep an eye out for worms in the coming weeks. I am seeing some basil downy mildew on basil. I have seen lots of ant and cricket damage on recently planted hemp.”

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Basil downy mildew. Photo from Zack Snipes.

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Cricket chewing damage on hemp stem. Photo from Zack Snipes.

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “It’s been hot and humid.  Some lucky folks have gotten some isolated showers, but overall, we need rain badly.  The humidity is allowing powdery mildew to pick up on cucurbits and pickleworms are showing up heavy in some fields.  Hemp is doing well so far.  We are seeing some mite, caterpillar, and cutworm activity.”

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Powdery mildew on a squash leaf. Photo from Justin Ballew

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Pickleworm in the middle of a squash.  Photo from Justin Ballew

Sarah Scott reports, “The peach crop in the Ridge is looking good.  Varieties are getting ready a couple weeks early and there is an abundance of  fruit being picked.”

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Peaches are coming in early on the Ridge, but are looking good. Photo from Sarah Scott

Pee Dee Region

Bruce McLean reports, “The recent rain showers have really helped the area crops. Cantaloupe and watermelons are seeing some good volumes coming out of the field.  Mid season cucumbers are looking good as well.  A consistent volume of peas are being picked and looking great.  Sweet corn volumes are starting to fall off as the season is winding down.  Muscadines are starting to size pretty well, and are looking very good.”

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Cucumbers are looking good. Photo from Bruce McLean

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Muscadines are sizing up. Photo from Bruce McLean

Tony Melton reports, “Butterbean harvest will be in full swing this week and it seems this week and next maybe our total spring harvest.  Processing peas will begin harvest this week if rains hold off.  Processing peppers are being harvested and will continue for next 4 weeks.  Also, processing tomatoes are being harvested and will continue for 4 weeks.  Harvest of second planting of pickles for processing will begin this week.   Last of the collards for processing will be harvested this week.”

Upstate

Kerrie Roach reports, “In apple news, we are about 2 weeks from picking the early golden varieties and about 4 weeks out from Galas. Hail damage is wreaking havoc at many orchards, and we are hoping for some clear weather for a few weeks to finish out the prime growing season. Peaches have finally come in and are looking good right now. Later varieties of peaches  at many orchards in the upstate are seeing between a 70-80 percent crop loss.”

Field Update – 6/17/19

Coastal Region

Zack Snipes reports, “We received a good amount of rain last week. Some farms got just the right amount while others received 15 inches or more. I am seeing disease now that the rain has passed in all crops, especially the tomato and cucurbit crops. Keep on top of your spray programs to finish the season out. I am also seeing some cracking in heirloom, cherry, and grape tomatoes because of the rain. Stink bugs are increasing in number and tomato growers should scout their crops for them and make adjustments to insecticide programs. On Friday I visited a farm that had buckwheat strips beside the cash crop. They had, by far, the least amount of insect pressure on their cash crops as a result of providing a beneficial insect refuge.

Stink bugs nymphs on a tomato. Photo from Zack Snipes
This buckwheat strip planted in the row middle provides refuge for beneficial insects. Photo from Zack Snipes.

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “The first half of the week was rainy, but by the end of the week, irrigation systems were running again in places. The temperatures have been pretty mild for mid June. Vegetables are growing fast since the rain and we’re picking sweet corn, green onions, tomatoes, peppers, squash, cucumbers, and zucchini now. We’re continuing to scout for downy mildew as it’s been found in several places on the coast now. It’s only a matter of time before it shows up here, so stay on top of spray programs. Hemp is also going in the ground.

Squash is growing fast. Photo from Justin Ballew
Hemp transplants ready to go to the field. Photo from Justin Ballew

Sarah Scott reports, “After a long period of dry weather, the recent rains have stirred up some cases of anthracnose in peaches and plums. Orchard floor and perimeter management of leguminous hosts and wild Prunus species can help prevent spread of this disease. Refer to the Southeastern Peach, Nectarine, and Plum Pest Management and Culture Guide for chemical recommendations to use pre-harvest. Peaches harvested in the Ridge are starting to get some size on them and are looking good.

Anthracnose on a peach. Photo from Sarah Scott
Peaches harvested on the Ridge are looking good. Photo from Sarah Scott.

Pee Dee Region

Tony Melton reports, “Only 1 farmer had butter beans to harvest. They were planted on March 23 and sneaked-by those last frosts.  After these the next harvests will be in July because of the heat causing flower drop and reset during the cool week of June 10.  It is drying out quickly and we will need another rain this week to keep crops going.  Collards are really doing well since the cool spell gave them relief from the heat.  Southern peas are flowering and need to be sprayed for cowpea cucurlio.  Snapbeans took a real hit from the heat and there will be poor yields except for later planted ones the flowered during the cool spell.

Field Update – 6/10/19

Statewide

Dr. Tony Keinath reported downy mildew being found on cucumbers in Bamberg County this past week. He cautioned all cucumber, cantaloupe, and watermelon growers to begin preventative sprays, if they are not already doing so. Refer back to this post for more info.

Downy mildew on cucumber leaves.

Coastal Region

Zack Snipes reports, “We finally got some much needed rain in the Lowcountry. I expect to see some disease to show up this week. Growers should be scouting all crops and spraying when needed. Downy mildew was found on cucurbits this week so be aware that you may see it in your fields as well. We had a great field day this week at the Coastal Research and Education Center.”

Clemson Plant Pathologist Tony Keinath discussing watermelon diseases at the Coastal REC Field Day. 6/5/19. Photo from Zack Snipes.

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “We had thunderstorms come through late in the week and it’s rained every day since. We needed it badly. Sweet corn and tomato picking has begun and they are looking good. We’re seeing a few stink bugs in sweet corn, but nothing severe. Powdery mildew is showing up on some cucurbits now that moisture has returned. Downy mildew could show up at any time here, so keep an eye out for that and stay on a good preventative spray schedule.

Sweetcorn ready for harvest. Photo from Justin Ballew
These tomatoes will be harvested soon. Photo from Justin Ballew

Sarah Scott reports, “Rain fall amounts range from 1 inch to over 5 throughout Aiken,Saluda and Edgefield Counties which will give irrigation systems a much needed break. Flea beetles are showing up on peppers.”

– Adult flea beetle and damage to pepper plant. Photos from Sarah Scott

Pee Dee Region

Tony Melton reports, “Pythium has been awful with all the heat.  Bad on snapbeans, cucumbers, etc.  Southern stem blight has been awful on tomatoes and peppers with the heat.  Black rot has taken over some kale, cabbage, collard fields.  Sensation strawberry has had very poor yields this spring but is still bearing in the heat.  Pickleworm is hear and is worse in yellow squash, then cucumbers, and then zucchini.  The heat caused the flowers to fall on the early planted butterbeans causing all the early plantings to come together with the later planting then with the rain and cooler temperatures all plantings are setting now.  It appears we may have butterbeans but all plantings will come in at the same time causing problems with marketing.”